How Can I Buy Bitcoins?

Last updated: 28th October 2015

OK, so you’ve learned the basics about bitcoin, the next step is to get some bitcoins. But how? This guide will tell you what you need to know.

You can buy bitcoins from either exchanges, or directly from other people via marketplaces.

You can pay for them in a multitude of ways, ranging from hard cash to credit and debit cards to wire transfers, or even with other cryptocurrencies, depending on who you are buying them from and where you live.

Remarkably, it’s still not effortless to buy bitcoins with your credit card or PayPal, depending on your jurisdiction.

This is because such transactions can lightly be reversed with a phone call to the card company (ie ‘chargebacks’). Since it’s hard to prove any goods switched arms in a transfer of bitcoins, exchanges avoid this payment method and so do most private sellers.

However, the options have recently grown for consumers in some countries.

In the US, Coinbase, and Circle suggest purchases with credit cards. Bittylicious, CoinCorner and Coinbase suggest this service in the UK, accepting 3D Secure-enabled credit and debit cards on the Visa and MasterCard networks.

Underbanked consumers in the US can turn to expresscoin, which recently launched to serve this market, accepting money orders, individual checks and wire transfers.

Very first, get yourself a bitcoin wallet

Next, you will need a place to store your fresh bitcoins. In the bitcoin world, they’re called a ‘wallet’ but it might be best to think of them as a kind of bank account.

Depending on the security levels you want, different wallets will provide different levels of security. Some act like everyday spending accounts and are comparable to a traditional leather wallet, while others tout military-grade protections.

The main options are: (1) a software wallet stored on the hard drive of your computer, (Two) an online, web-based service or (Trio) a ‘vault’ service that keeps your bitcoins protected offline or multisig wallet that uses a number of keys to protect the account.

Most have their vulnerabilities: if you store bitcoins locally on your computer, make sure you back up your wallet regularly in case the drive becomes corrupted; and online web wallets employ varying degrees of security against hackers, from fairly good (multi-factor authentication) to fairly poor (ID and password).

For more on storing bitcoins, see our guide on the subject.

Exchanges and Online Wallets

Bitcoin newcomers will find a multitude of exchanges and wallets challenging for their business.

Some are full-blown exchanges for institutional traders, while others are simpler wallet services with a more limited buying and selling capabilities.

Most exchanges and wallets will store amounts of digital and/or fiat currency for you, much like a regular bank account.

Exchanges and wallets are the best option if you want to engage in regular trading and speculation, don’t need total anonymity and don’t mind lengthy bureaucratic setup procedures that usually involve proof of identity and supplying detailed contact information.

This is the law in most countries and no regulated exchange can get around it, as any company interfacing with the current financial system must meet ‘know your customer’ (KYC) and anti-money laundering (AML) requirements.

The best exchange option also depends where you’re located.

For more information, you can check out this list of major bitcoin exchanges/wallets around the world, and the payment options they permit.

At this time, the largest utter trading exchanges by volume are Bitfinex (Hong Kong), Bitstamp (US), BTC-e (unknown), Kraken (US), Huobi (China and Hong Kong), OKCoin (China) and BTCC (China).

Coinbase is a popular wallet and exchange service that will also trade US dollars and euros for bitcoins. The company has web and mobile apps. Originally a US-only service, Coinbase has recently opened up to a large number of European countries.

Circle offers users worldwide the chance to store, send, receive and exchange bitcoins. Presently only US citizens are able to link bank accounts to deposit funds, but credit and debit cards are also an option. Apps for iOS and Android are now available.

Wallet and bitcoin debit card provider Xapo has also recently entered the fray, suggesting deposits in fiat currency that are converted to bitcoin in your account.

Coinjar, an exchange and wallet provider, is the market leader in Australia. The Melbourne-based startup raised $500k AUD in venture funding and won an award at Finovate Europe two thousand fifteen for their user practice. The company released a debit card service, ‘Coinjar Swipe’ in February 2015.

The ‘Coinjar Swipe’ permits Australians to spend from Coinjar bitcoin accounts.

Unocoin is an exchange aimed at the Indian market, permitting users to buy, sell and store bitcoin. Deposits can be made via any national online bank or through NEFT/RTGS. Registration with a PAN card is necessary to use the site’s services.

Once you’ve set up your account, you’ll most likely need to link an existing bank account and arrange to budge funds inbetween it and your fresh exchange account via wire transfer. This usually entails a fee. Some exchanges permit you to make a deposit in person to their bank account (that is, via a human teller, not an ATM).

While people in most countries can transfer money to overseas accounts, fees are much higher and you may face more long delays switching your bitcoins back into fiat currency (should you still wish to do that).

If you are required to link a bank account to use the exchange, it may only admit banks from that country.

How can I buy bitcoins?

How Can I Buy Bitcoins?

Last updated: 28th October 2015

OK, so you’ve learned the basics about bitcoin, the next step is to get some bitcoins. But how? This guide will tell you what you need to know.

You can buy bitcoins from either exchanges, or directly from other people via marketplaces.

You can pay for them in a diversity of ways, ranging from hard cash to credit and debit cards to wire transfers, or even with other cryptocurrencies, depending on who you are buying them from and where you live.

Remarkably, it’s still not effortless to buy bitcoins with your credit card or PayPal, depending on your jurisdiction.

This is because such transactions can lightly be reversed with a phone call to the card company (ie ‘chargebacks’). Since it’s hard to prove any goods switched palms in a transfer of bitcoins, exchanges avoid this payment method and so do most private sellers.

However, the options have recently grown for consumers in some countries.

In the US, Coinbase, and Circle suggest purchases with credit cards. Bittylicious, CoinCorner and Coinbase suggest this service in the UK, accepting 3D Secure-enabled credit and debit cards on the Visa and MasterCard networks.

Underbanked consumers in the US can turn to expresscoin, which recently launched to serve this market, accepting money orders, private checks and wire transfers.

Very first, get yourself a bitcoin wallet

Next, you will need a place to store your fresh bitcoins. In the bitcoin world, they’re called a ‘wallet’ but it might be best to think of them as a kind of bank account.

Depending on the security levels you want, different wallets will provide different levels of security. Some act like everyday spending accounts and are comparable to a traditional leather wallet, while others tout military-grade protections.

The main options are: (1) a software wallet stored on the hard drive of your computer, (Two) an online, web-based service or (Three) a ‘vault’ service that keeps your bitcoins protected offline or multisig wallet that uses a number of keys to protect the account.

Most have their vulnerabilities: if you store bitcoins locally on your computer, make sure you back up your wallet regularly in case the drive becomes corrupted; and online web wallets employ varying degrees of security against hackers, from fairly good (multi-factor authentication) to fairly poor (ID and password).

For more on storing bitcoins, see our guide on the subject.

Exchanges and Online Wallets

Bitcoin newcomers will find a diversity of exchanges and wallets rivaling for their business.

Some are full-blown exchanges for institutional traders, while others are simpler wallet services with a more limited buying and selling capabilities.

Most exchanges and wallets will store amounts of digital and/or fiat currency for you, much like a regular bank account.

Exchanges and wallets are the best option if you want to engage in regular trading and speculation, don’t need total anonymity and don’t mind lengthy bureaucratic setup procedures that usually involve proof of identity and supplying detailed contact information.

This is the law in most countries and no regulated exchange can get around it, as any company interfacing with the current financial system must meet ‘know your customer’ (KYC) and anti-money laundering (AML) requirements.

The best exchange option also depends where you’re located.

For more information, you can check out this list of major bitcoin exchanges/wallets around the world, and the payment options they permit.

At this time, the largest total trading exchanges by volume are Bitfinex (Hong Kong), Bitstamp (US), BTC-e (unknown), Kraken (US), Huobi (China and Hong Kong), OKCoin (China) and BTCC (China).

Coinbase is a popular wallet and exchange service that will also trade US dollars and euros for bitcoins. The company has web and mobile apps. Originally a US-only service, Coinbase has recently opened up to a large number of European countries.

Circle offers users worldwide the chance to store, send, receive and exchange bitcoins. Presently only US citizens are able to link bank accounts to deposit funds, but credit and debit cards are also an option. Apps for iOS and Android are now available.

Wallet and bitcoin debit card provider Xapo has also recently entered the fray, suggesting deposits in fiat currency that are converted to bitcoin in your account.

Coinjar, an exchange and wallet provider, is the market leader in Australia. The Melbourne-based startup raised $500k AUD in venture funding and won an award at Finovate Europe two thousand fifteen for their user practice. The company released a debit card service, ‘Coinjar Swipe’ in February 2015.

The ‘Coinjar Swipe’ permits Australians to spend from Coinjar bitcoin accounts.

Unocoin is an exchange aimed at the Indian market, permitting users to buy, sell and store bitcoin. Deposits can be made via any national online bank or through NEFT/RTGS. Registration with a PAN card is necessary to use the site’s services.

Once you’ve set up your account, you’ll very likely need to link an existing bank account and arrange to budge funds inbetween it and your fresh exchange account via wire transfer. This usually entails a fee. Some exchanges permit you to make a deposit in person to their bank account (that is, via a human teller, not an ATM).

While people in most countries can transfer money to overseas accounts, fees are much higher and you may face more long delays switching your bitcoins back into fiat currency (should you still wish to do that).

If you are required to link a bank account to use the exchange, it may only admit banks from that country.

How can I buy bitcoins?

How Can I Buy Bitcoins?

Last updated: 28th October 2015

OK, so you’ve learned the basics about bitcoin, the next step is to get some bitcoins. But how? This guide will tell you what you need to know.

You can buy bitcoins from either exchanges, or directly from other people via marketplaces.

You can pay for them in a diversity of ways, ranging from hard cash to credit and debit cards to wire transfers, or even with other cryptocurrencies, depending on who you are buying them from and where you live.

Remarkably, it’s still not effortless to buy bitcoins with your credit card or PayPal, depending on your jurisdiction.

This is because such transactions can lightly be reversed with a phone call to the card company (ie ‘chargebacks’). Since it’s hard to prove any goods switched arms in a transfer of bitcoins, exchanges avoid this payment method and so do most private sellers.

However, the options have recently grown for consumers in some countries.

In the US, Coinbase, and Circle suggest purchases with credit cards. Bittylicious, CoinCorner and Coinbase suggest this service in the UK, accepting 3D Secure-enabled credit and debit cards on the Visa and MasterCard networks.

Underbanked consumers in the US can turn to expresscoin, which recently launched to serve this market, accepting money orders, individual checks and wire transfers.

Very first, get yourself a bitcoin wallet

Next, you will need a place to store your fresh bitcoins. In the bitcoin world, they’re called a ‘wallet’ but it might be best to think of them as a kind of bank account.

Depending on the security levels you want, different wallets will provide different levels of security. Some act like everyday spending accounts and are comparable to a traditional leather wallet, while others tout military-grade protections.

The main options are: (1) a software wallet stored on the hard drive of your computer, (Two) an online, web-based service or (Three) a ‘vault’ service that keeps your bitcoins protected offline or multisig wallet that uses a number of keys to protect the account.

Most have their vulnerabilities: if you store bitcoins locally on your computer, make sure you back up your wallet regularly in case the drive becomes corrupted; and online web wallets employ varying degrees of security against hackers, from fairly good (multi-factor authentication) to fairly poor (ID and password).

For more on storing bitcoins, see our guide on the subject.

Exchanges and Online Wallets

Bitcoin newcomers will find a diversity of exchanges and wallets rivaling for their business.

Some are full-blown exchanges for institutional traders, while others are simpler wallet services with a more limited buying and selling capabilities.

Most exchanges and wallets will store amounts of digital and/or fiat currency for you, much like a regular bank account.

Exchanges and wallets are the best option if you want to engage in regular trading and speculation, don’t need total anonymity and don’t mind lengthy bureaucratic setup procedures that usually involve proof of identity and supplying detailed contact information.

This is the law in most countries and no regulated exchange can get around it, as any company interfacing with the current financial system must meet ‘know your customer’ (KYC) and anti-money laundering (AML) requirements.

The best exchange option also depends where you’re located.

For more information, you can check out this list of major bitcoin exchanges/wallets around the world, and the payment options they permit.

At this time, the largest total trading exchanges by volume are Bitfinex (Hong Kong), Bitstamp (US), BTC-e (unknown), Kraken (US), Huobi (China and Hong Kong), OKCoin (China) and BTCC (China).

Coinbase is a popular wallet and exchange service that will also trade US dollars and euros for bitcoins. The company has web and mobile apps. Originally a US-only service, Coinbase has recently opened up to a large number of European countries.

Circle offers users worldwide the chance to store, send, receive and exchange bitcoins. Presently only US citizens are able to link bank accounts to deposit funds, but credit and debit cards are also an option. Apps for iOS and Android are now available.

Wallet and bitcoin debit card provider Xapo has also recently entered the fray, suggesting deposits in fiat currency that are converted to bitcoin in your account.

Coinjar, an exchange and wallet provider, is the market leader in Australia. The Melbourne-based startup raised $500k AUD in venture funding and won an award at Finovate Europe two thousand fifteen for their user practice. The company released a debit card service, ‘Coinjar Swipe’ in February 2015.

The ‘Coinjar Swipe’ permits Australians to spend from Coinjar bitcoin accounts.

Unocoin is an exchange aimed at the Indian market, permitting users to buy, sell and store bitcoin. Deposits can be made via any national online bank or through NEFT/RTGS. Registration with a PAN card is necessary to use the site’s services.

Once you’ve set up your account, you’ll very likely need to link an existing bank account and arrange to budge funds inbetween it and your fresh exchange account via wire transfer. This usually entails a fee. Some exchanges permit you to make a deposit in person to their bank account (that is, via a human teller, not an ATM).

While people in most countries can transfer money to overseas accounts, fees are much higher and you may face more long delays switching your bitcoins back into fiat currency (should you still wish to do that).

If you are required to link a bank account to use the exchange, it may only admit banks from that country.

How can I buy bitcoins?

How Can I Buy Bitcoins?

Last updated: 28th October 2015

OK, so you’ve learned the basics about bitcoin, the next step is to get some bitcoins. But how? This guide will tell you what you need to know.

You can buy bitcoins from either exchanges, or directly from other people via marketplaces.

You can pay for them in a diversity of ways, ranging from hard cash to credit and debit cards to wire transfers, or even with other cryptocurrencies, depending on who you are buying them from and where you live.

Remarkably, it’s still not effortless to buy bitcoins with your credit card or PayPal, depending on your jurisdiction.

This is because such transactions can lightly be reversed with a phone call to the card company (ie ‘chargebacks’). Since it’s hard to prove any goods switched palms in a transfer of bitcoins, exchanges avoid this payment method and so do most private sellers.

However, the options have recently grown for consumers in some countries.

In the US, Coinbase, and Circle suggest purchases with credit cards. Bittylicious, CoinCorner and Coinbase suggest this service in the UK, accepting 3D Secure-enabled credit and debit cards on the Visa and MasterCard networks.

Underbanked consumers in the US can turn to expresscoin, which recently launched to serve this market, accepting money orders, private checks and wire transfers.

Very first, get yourself a bitcoin wallet

Next, you will need a place to store your fresh bitcoins. In the bitcoin world, they’re called a ‘wallet’ but it might be best to think of them as a kind of bank account.

Depending on the security levels you want, different wallets will provide different levels of security. Some act like everyday spending accounts and are comparable to a traditional leather wallet, while others tout military-grade protections.

The main options are: (1) a software wallet stored on the hard drive of your computer, (Two) an online, web-based service or (Trio) a ‘vault’ service that keeps your bitcoins protected offline or multisig wallet that uses a number of keys to protect the account.

Most have their vulnerabilities: if you store bitcoins locally on your computer, make sure you back up your wallet regularly in case the drive becomes corrupted; and online web wallets employ varying degrees of security against hackers, from fairly good (multi-factor authentication) to fairly poor (ID and password).

For more on storing bitcoins, see our guide on the subject.

Exchanges and Online Wallets

Bitcoin newcomers will find a multitude of exchanges and wallets contesting for their business.

Some are full-blown exchanges for institutional traders, while others are simpler wallet services with a more limited buying and selling capabilities.

Most exchanges and wallets will store amounts of digital and/or fiat currency for you, much like a regular bank account.

Exchanges and wallets are the best option if you want to engage in regular trading and speculation, don’t need total anonymity and don’t mind lengthy bureaucratic setup procedures that usually involve proof of identity and supplying detailed contact information.

This is the law in most countries and no regulated exchange can get around it, as any company interfacing with the current financial system must meet ‘know your customer’ (KYC) and anti-money laundering (AML) requirements.

The best exchange option also depends where you’re located.

For more information, you can check out this list of major bitcoin exchanges/wallets around the world, and the payment options they permit.

At this time, the largest total trading exchanges by volume are Bitfinex (Hong Kong), Bitstamp (US), BTC-e (unknown), Kraken (US), Huobi (China and Hong Kong), OKCoin (China) and BTCC (China).

Coinbase is a popular wallet and exchange service that will also trade US dollars and euros for bitcoins. The company has web and mobile apps. Originally a US-only service, Coinbase has recently opened up to a large number of European countries.

Circle offers users worldwide the chance to store, send, receive and exchange bitcoins. Presently only US citizens are able to link bank accounts to deposit funds, but credit and debit cards are also an option. Apps for iOS and Android are now available.

Wallet and bitcoin debit card provider Xapo has also recently entered the fray, suggesting deposits in fiat currency that are converted to bitcoin in your account.

Coinjar, an exchange and wallet provider, is the market leader in Australia. The Melbourne-based startup raised $500k AUD in venture funding and won an award at Finovate Europe two thousand fifteen for their user practice. The company released a debit card service, ‘Coinjar Swipe’ in February 2015.

The ‘Coinjar Swipe’ permits Australians to spend from Coinjar bitcoin accounts.

Unocoin is an exchange aimed at the Indian market, permitting users to buy, sell and store bitcoin. Deposits can be made via any national online bank or through NEFT/RTGS. Registration with a PAN card is necessary to use the site’s services.

Once you’ve set up your account, you’ll most likely need to link an existing bank account and arrange to stir funds inbetween it and your fresh exchange account via wire transfer. This usually entails a fee. Some exchanges permit you to make a deposit in person to their bank account (that is, via a human teller, not an ATM).

While people in most countries can transfer money to overseas accounts, fees are much higher and you may face more long delays switching your bitcoins back into fiat currency (should you still wish to do that).

If you are required to link a bank account to use the exchange, it may only admit banks from that country.

How can I buy bitcoins?

How Can I Buy Bitcoins?

Last updated: 28th October 2015

OK, so you’ve learned the basics about bitcoin, the next step is to get some bitcoins. But how? This guide will tell you what you need to know.

You can buy bitcoins from either exchanges, or directly from other people via marketplaces.

You can pay for them in a multitude of ways, ranging from hard cash to credit and debit cards to wire transfers, or even with other cryptocurrencies, depending on who you are buying them from and where you live.

Remarkably, it’s still not effortless to buy bitcoins with your credit card or PayPal, depending on your jurisdiction.

This is because such transactions can lightly be reversed with a phone call to the card company (ie ‘chargebacks’). Since it’s hard to prove any goods switched palms in a transfer of bitcoins, exchanges avoid this payment method and so do most private sellers.

However, the options have recently grown for consumers in some countries.

In the US, Coinbase, and Circle suggest purchases with credit cards. Bittylicious, CoinCorner and Coinbase suggest this service in the UK, accepting 3D Secure-enabled credit and debit cards on the Visa and MasterCard networks.

Underbanked consumers in the US can turn to expresscoin, which recently launched to serve this market, accepting money orders, private checks and wire transfers.

Very first, get yourself a bitcoin wallet

Next, you will need a place to store your fresh bitcoins. In the bitcoin world, they’re called a ‘wallet’ but it might be best to think of them as a kind of bank account.

Depending on the security levels you want, different wallets will provide different levels of security. Some act like everyday spending accounts and are comparable to a traditional leather wallet, while others tout military-grade protections.

The main options are: (1) a software wallet stored on the hard drive of your computer, (Two) an online, web-based service or (Trio) a ‘vault’ service that keeps your bitcoins protected offline or multisig wallet that uses a number of keys to protect the account.

Most have their vulnerabilities: if you store bitcoins locally on your computer, make sure you back up your wallet regularly in case the drive becomes corrupted; and online web wallets employ varying degrees of security against hackers, from fairly good (multi-factor authentication) to fairly poor (ID and password).

For more on storing bitcoins, see our guide on the subject.

Exchanges and Online Wallets

Bitcoin newcomers will find a diversity of exchanges and wallets challenging for their business.

Some are full-blown exchanges for institutional traders, while others are simpler wallet services with a more limited buying and selling capabilities.

Most exchanges and wallets will store amounts of digital and/or fiat currency for you, much like a regular bank account.

Exchanges and wallets are the best option if you want to engage in regular trading and speculation, don’t need total anonymity and don’t mind lengthy bureaucratic setup procedures that usually involve proof of identity and supplying detailed contact information.

This is the law in most countries and no regulated exchange can get around it, as any company interfacing with the current financial system must meet ‘know your customer’ (KYC) and anti-money laundering (AML) requirements.

The best exchange option also depends where you’re located.

For more information, you can check out this list of major bitcoin exchanges/wallets around the world, and the payment options they permit.

At this time, the largest total trading exchanges by volume are Bitfinex (Hong Kong), Bitstamp (US), BTC-e (unknown), Kraken (US), Huobi (China and Hong Kong), OKCoin (China) and BTCC (China).

Coinbase is a popular wallet and exchange service that will also trade US dollars and euros for bitcoins. The company has web and mobile apps. Originally a US-only service, Coinbase has recently opened up to a large number of European countries.

Circle offers users worldwide the chance to store, send, receive and exchange bitcoins. Presently only US citizens are able to link bank accounts to deposit funds, but credit and debit cards are also an option. Apps for iOS and Android are now available.

Wallet and bitcoin debit card provider Xapo has also recently entered the fray, suggesting deposits in fiat currency that are converted to bitcoin in your account.

Coinjar, an exchange and wallet provider, is the market leader in Australia. The Melbourne-based startup raised $500k AUD in venture funding and won an award at Finovate Europe two thousand fifteen for their user practice. The company released a debit card service, ‘Coinjar Swipe’ in February 2015.

The ‘Coinjar Swipe’ permits Australians to spend from Coinjar bitcoin accounts.

Unocoin is an exchange aimed at the Indian market, permitting users to buy, sell and store bitcoin. Deposits can be made via any national online bank or through NEFT/RTGS. Registration with a PAN card is necessary to use the site’s services.

Once you’ve set up your account, you’ll most likely need to link an existing bank account and arrange to budge funds inbetween it and your fresh exchange account via wire transfer. This usually entails a fee. Some exchanges permit you to make a deposit in person to their bank account (that is, via a human teller, not an ATM).

While people in most countries can transfer money to overseas accounts, fees are much higher and you may face more long delays switching your bitcoins back into fiat currency (should you still wish to do that).

If you are required to link a bank account to use the exchange, it may only admit banks from that country.

How can I buy bitcoins?

How Can I Buy Bitcoins?

Last updated: 28th October 2015

OK, so you’ve learned the basics about bitcoin, the next step is to get some bitcoins. But how? This guide will tell you what you need to know.

You can buy bitcoins from either exchanges, or directly from other people via marketplaces.

You can pay for them in a multitude of ways, ranging from hard cash to credit and debit cards to wire transfers, or even with other cryptocurrencies, depending on who you are buying them from and where you live.

Remarkably, it’s still not effortless to buy bitcoins with your credit card or PayPal, depending on your jurisdiction.

This is because such transactions can lightly be reversed with a phone call to the card company (ie ‘chargebacks’). Since it’s hard to prove any goods switched mitts in a transfer of bitcoins, exchanges avoid this payment method and so do most private sellers.

However, the options have recently grown for consumers in some countries.

In the US, Coinbase, and Circle suggest purchases with credit cards. Bittylicious, CoinCorner and Coinbase suggest this service in the UK, accepting 3D Secure-enabled credit and debit cards on the Visa and MasterCard networks.

Underbanked consumers in the US can turn to expresscoin, which recently launched to serve this market, accepting money orders, private checks and wire transfers.

Very first, get yourself a bitcoin wallet

Next, you will need a place to store your fresh bitcoins. In the bitcoin world, they’re called a ‘wallet’ but it might be best to think of them as a kind of bank account.

Depending on the security levels you want, different wallets will provide different levels of security. Some act like everyday spending accounts and are comparable to a traditional leather wallet, while others tout military-grade protections.

The main options are: (1) a software wallet stored on the hard drive of your computer, (Two) an online, web-based service or (Trio) a ‘vault’ service that keeps your bitcoins protected offline or multisig wallet that uses a number of keys to protect the account.

Most have their vulnerabilities: if you store bitcoins locally on your computer, make sure you back up your wallet regularly in case the drive becomes corrupted; and online web wallets employ varying degrees of security against hackers, from fairly good (multi-factor authentication) to fairly poor (ID and password).

For more on storing bitcoins, see our guide on the subject.

Exchanges and Online Wallets

Bitcoin newcomers will find a multitude of exchanges and wallets challenging for their business.

Some are full-blown exchanges for institutional traders, while others are simpler wallet services with a more limited buying and selling capabilities.

Most exchanges and wallets will store amounts of digital and/or fiat currency for you, much like a regular bank account.

Exchanges and wallets are the best option if you want to engage in regular trading and speculation, don’t need total anonymity and don’t mind lengthy bureaucratic setup procedures that usually involve proof of identity and supplying detailed contact information.

This is the law in most countries and no regulated exchange can get around it, as any company interfacing with the current financial system must meet ‘know your customer’ (KYC) and anti-money laundering (AML) requirements.

The best exchange option also depends where you’re located.

For more information, you can check out this list of major bitcoin exchanges/wallets around the world, and the payment options they permit.

At this time, the largest utter trading exchanges by volume are Bitfinex (Hong Kong), Bitstamp (US), BTC-e (unknown), Kraken (US), Huobi (China and Hong Kong), OKCoin (China) and BTCC (China).

Coinbase is a popular wallet and exchange service that will also trade US dollars and euros for bitcoins. The company has web and mobile apps. Originally a US-only service, Coinbase has recently opened up to a large number of European countries.

Circle offers users worldwide the chance to store, send, receive and exchange bitcoins. Presently only US citizens are able to link bank accounts to deposit funds, but credit and debit cards are also an option. Apps for iOS and Android are now available.

Wallet and bitcoin debit card provider Xapo has also recently entered the fray, suggesting deposits in fiat currency that are converted to bitcoin in your account.

Coinjar, an exchange and wallet provider, is the market leader in Australia. The Melbourne-based startup raised $500k AUD in venture funding and won an award at Finovate Europe two thousand fifteen for their user practice. The company released a debit card service, ‘Coinjar Swipe’ in February 2015.

The ‘Coinjar Swipe’ permits Australians to spend from Coinjar bitcoin accounts.

Unocoin is an exchange aimed at the Indian market, permitting users to buy, sell and store bitcoin. Deposits can be made via any national online bank or through NEFT/RTGS. Registration with a PAN card is necessary to use the site’s services.

Once you’ve set up your account, you’ll very likely need to link an existing bank account and arrange to budge funds inbetween it and your fresh exchange account via wire transfer. This usually entails a fee. Some exchanges permit you to make a deposit in person to their bank account (that is, via a human teller, not an ATM).

While people in most countries can transfer money to overseas accounts, fees are much higher and you may face more long delays switching your bitcoins back into fiat currency (should you still wish to do that).

If you are required to link a bank account to use the exchange, it may only admit banks from that country.

How can I buy bitcoins?

How Can I Buy Bitcoins?

Last updated: 28th October 2015

OK, so you’ve learned the basics about bitcoin, the next step is to get some bitcoins. But how? This guide will tell you what you need to know.

You can buy bitcoins from either exchanges, or directly from other people via marketplaces.

You can pay for them in a multiplicity of ways, ranging from hard cash to credit and debit cards to wire transfers, or even with other cryptocurrencies, depending on who you are buying them from and where you live.

Remarkably, it’s still not effortless to buy bitcoins with your credit card or PayPal, depending on your jurisdiction.

This is because such transactions can lightly be reversed with a phone call to the card company (ie ‘chargebacks’). Since it’s hard to prove any goods switched forearms in a transfer of bitcoins, exchanges avoid this payment method and so do most private sellers.

However, the options have recently grown for consumers in some countries.

In the US, Coinbase, and Circle suggest purchases with credit cards. Bittylicious, CoinCorner and Coinbase suggest this service in the UK, accepting 3D Secure-enabled credit and debit cards on the Visa and MasterCard networks.

Underbanked consumers in the US can turn to expresscoin, which recently launched to serve this market, accepting money orders, private checks and wire transfers.

Very first, get yourself a bitcoin wallet

Next, you will need a place to store your fresh bitcoins. In the bitcoin world, they’re called a ‘wallet’ but it might be best to think of them as a kind of bank account.

Depending on the security levels you want, different wallets will provide different levels of security. Some act like everyday spending accounts and are comparable to a traditional leather wallet, while others tout military-grade protections.

The main options are: (1) a software wallet stored on the hard drive of your computer, (Two) an online, web-based service or (Three) a ‘vault’ service that keeps your bitcoins protected offline or multisig wallet that uses a number of keys to protect the account.

Most have their vulnerabilities: if you store bitcoins locally on your computer, make sure you back up your wallet regularly in case the drive becomes corrupted; and online web wallets employ varying degrees of security against hackers, from fairly good (multi-factor authentication) to fairly poor (ID and password).

For more on storing bitcoins, see our guide on the subject.

Exchanges and Online Wallets

Bitcoin newcomers will find a multitude of exchanges and wallets challenging for their business.

Some are full-blown exchanges for institutional traders, while others are simpler wallet services with a more limited buying and selling capabilities.

Most exchanges and wallets will store amounts of digital and/or fiat currency for you, much like a regular bank account.

Exchanges and wallets are the best option if you want to engage in regular trading and speculation, don’t need total anonymity and don’t mind lengthy bureaucratic setup procedures that usually involve proof of identity and supplying detailed contact information.

This is the law in most countries and no regulated exchange can get around it, as any company interfacing with the current financial system must meet ‘know your customer’ (KYC) and anti-money laundering (AML) requirements.

The best exchange option also depends where you’re located.

For more information, you can check out this list of major bitcoin exchanges/wallets around the world, and the payment options they permit.

At this time, the largest utter trading exchanges by volume are Bitfinex (Hong Kong), Bitstamp (US), BTC-e (unknown), Kraken (US), Huobi (China and Hong Kong), OKCoin (China) and BTCC (China).

Coinbase is a popular wallet and exchange service that will also trade US dollars and euros for bitcoins. The company has web and mobile apps. Originally a US-only service, Coinbase has recently opened up to a large number of European countries.

Circle offers users worldwide the chance to store, send, receive and exchange bitcoins. Presently only US citizens are able to link bank accounts to deposit funds, but credit and debit cards are also an option. Apps for iOS and Android are now available.

Wallet and bitcoin debit card provider Xapo has also recently entered the fray, suggesting deposits in fiat currency that are converted to bitcoin in your account.

Coinjar, an exchange and wallet provider, is the market leader in Australia. The Melbourne-based startup raised $500k AUD in venture funding and won an award at Finovate Europe two thousand fifteen for their user practice. The company released a debit card service, ‘Coinjar Swipe’ in February 2015.

The ‘Coinjar Swipe’ permits Australians to spend from Coinjar bitcoin accounts.

Unocoin is an exchange aimed at the Indian market, permitting users to buy, sell and store bitcoin. Deposits can be made via any national online bank or through NEFT/RTGS. Registration with a PAN card is necessary to use the site’s services.

Once you’ve set up your account, you’ll most likely need to link an existing bank account and arrange to stir funds inbetween it and your fresh exchange account via wire transfer. This usually entails a fee. Some exchanges permit you to make a deposit in person to their bank account (that is, via a human teller, not an ATM).

While people in most countries can transfer money to overseas accounts, fees are much higher and you may face more long delays switching your bitcoins back into fiat currency (should you still wish to do that).

If you are required to link a bank account to use the exchange, it may only admit banks from that country.

How can I buy bitcoins?

How Can I Buy Bitcoins?

Last updated: 28th October 2015

OK, so you’ve learned the basics about bitcoin, the next step is to get some bitcoins. But how? This guide will tell you what you need to know.

You can buy bitcoins from either exchanges, or directly from other people via marketplaces.

You can pay for them in a multiplicity of ways, ranging from hard cash to credit and debit cards to wire transfers, or even with other cryptocurrencies, depending on who you are buying them from and where you live.

Remarkably, it’s still not effortless to buy bitcoins with your credit card or PayPal, depending on your jurisdiction.

This is because such transactions can lightly be reversed with a phone call to the card company (ie ‘chargebacks’). Since it’s hard to prove any goods switched arms in a transfer of bitcoins, exchanges avoid this payment method and so do most private sellers.

However, the options have recently grown for consumers in some countries.

In the US, Coinbase, and Circle suggest purchases with credit cards. Bittylicious, CoinCorner and Coinbase suggest this service in the UK, accepting 3D Secure-enabled credit and debit cards on the Visa and MasterCard networks.

Underbanked consumers in the US can turn to expresscoin, which recently launched to serve this market, accepting money orders, individual checks and wire transfers.

Very first, get yourself a bitcoin wallet

Next, you will need a place to store your fresh bitcoins. In the bitcoin world, they’re called a ‘wallet’ but it might be best to think of them as a kind of bank account.

Depending on the security levels you want, different wallets will provide different levels of security. Some act like everyday spending accounts and are comparable to a traditional leather wallet, while others tout military-grade protections.

The main options are: (1) a software wallet stored on the hard drive of your computer, (Two) an online, web-based service or (Three) a ‘vault’ service that keeps your bitcoins protected offline or multisig wallet that uses a number of keys to protect the account.

Most have their vulnerabilities: if you store bitcoins locally on your computer, make sure you back up your wallet regularly in case the drive becomes corrupted; and online web wallets employ varying degrees of security against hackers, from fairly good (multi-factor authentication) to fairly poor (ID and password).

For more on storing bitcoins, see our guide on the subject.

Exchanges and Online Wallets

Bitcoin newcomers will find a diversity of exchanges and wallets challenging for their business.

Some are full-blown exchanges for institutional traders, while others are simpler wallet services with a more limited buying and selling capabilities.

Most exchanges and wallets will store amounts of digital and/or fiat currency for you, much like a regular bank account.

Exchanges and wallets are the best option if you want to engage in regular trading and speculation, don’t need total anonymity and don’t mind lengthy bureaucratic setup procedures that usually involve proof of identity and supplying detailed contact information.

This is the law in most countries and no regulated exchange can get around it, as any company interfacing with the current financial system must meet ‘know your customer’ (KYC) and anti-money laundering (AML) requirements.

The best exchange option also depends where you’re located.

For more information, you can check out this list of major bitcoin exchanges/wallets around the world, and the payment options they permit.

At this time, the largest utter trading exchanges by volume are Bitfinex (Hong Kong), Bitstamp (US), BTC-e (unknown), Kraken (US), Huobi (China and Hong Kong), OKCoin (China) and BTCC (China).

Coinbase is a popular wallet and exchange service that will also trade US dollars and euros for bitcoins. The company has web and mobile apps. Originally a US-only service, Coinbase has recently opened up to a large number of European countries.

Circle offers users worldwide the chance to store, send, receive and exchange bitcoins. Presently only US citizens are able to link bank accounts to deposit funds, but credit and debit cards are also an option. Apps for iOS and Android are now available.

Wallet and bitcoin debit card provider Xapo has also recently entered the fray, suggesting deposits in fiat currency that are converted to bitcoin in your account.

Coinjar, an exchange and wallet provider, is the market leader in Australia. The Melbourne-based startup raised $500k AUD in venture funding and won an award at Finovate Europe two thousand fifteen for their user practice. The company released a debit card service, ‘Coinjar Swipe’ in February 2015.

The ‘Coinjar Swipe’ permits Australians to spend from Coinjar bitcoin accounts.

Unocoin is an exchange aimed at the Indian market, permitting users to buy, sell and store bitcoin. Deposits can be made via any national online bank or through NEFT/RTGS. Registration with a PAN card is necessary to use the site’s services.

Once you’ve set up your account, you’ll very likely need to link an existing bank account and arrange to stir funds inbetween it and your fresh exchange account via wire transfer. This usually entails a fee. Some exchanges permit you to make a deposit in person to their bank account (that is, via a human teller, not an ATM).

While people in most countries can transfer money to overseas accounts, fees are much higher and you may face more long delays switching your bitcoins back into fiat currency (should you still wish to do that).

If you are required to link a bank account to use the exchange, it may only admit banks from that country.

How can I buy bitcoins?

How Can I Buy Bitcoins?

Last updated: 28th October 2015

OK, so you’ve learned the basics about bitcoin, the next step is to get some bitcoins. But how? This guide will tell you what you need to know.

You can buy bitcoins from either exchanges, or directly from other people via marketplaces.

You can pay for them in a multitude of ways, ranging from hard cash to credit and debit cards to wire transfers, or even with other cryptocurrencies, depending on who you are buying them from and where you live.

Remarkably, it’s still not effortless to buy bitcoins with your credit card or PayPal, depending on your jurisdiction.

This is because such transactions can lightly be reversed with a phone call to the card company (ie ‘chargebacks’). Since it’s hard to prove any goods switched mitts in a transfer of bitcoins, exchanges avoid this payment method and so do most private sellers.

However, the options have recently grown for consumers in some countries.

In the US, Coinbase, and Circle suggest purchases with credit cards. Bittylicious, CoinCorner and Coinbase suggest this service in the UK, accepting 3D Secure-enabled credit and debit cards on the Visa and MasterCard networks.

Underbanked consumers in the US can turn to expresscoin, which recently launched to serve this market, accepting money orders, individual checks and wire transfers.

Very first, get yourself a bitcoin wallet

Next, you will need a place to store your fresh bitcoins. In the bitcoin world, they’re called a ‘wallet’ but it might be best to think of them as a kind of bank account.

Depending on the security levels you want, different wallets will provide different levels of security. Some act like everyday spending accounts and are comparable to a traditional leather wallet, while others tout military-grade protections.

The main options are: (1) a software wallet stored on the hard drive of your computer, (Two) an online, web-based service or (Three) a ‘vault’ service that keeps your bitcoins protected offline or multisig wallet that uses a number of keys to protect the account.

Most have their vulnerabilities: if you store bitcoins locally on your computer, make sure you back up your wallet regularly in case the drive becomes corrupted; and online web wallets employ varying degrees of security against hackers, from fairly good (multi-factor authentication) to fairly poor (ID and password).

For more on storing bitcoins, see our guide on the subject.

Exchanges and Online Wallets

Bitcoin newcomers will find a multiplicity of exchanges and wallets challenging for their business.

Some are full-blown exchanges for institutional traders, while others are simpler wallet services with a more limited buying and selling capabilities.

Most exchanges and wallets will store amounts of digital and/or fiat currency for you, much like a regular bank account.

Exchanges and wallets are the best option if you want to engage in regular trading and speculation, don’t need total anonymity and don’t mind lengthy bureaucratic setup procedures that usually involve proof of identity and supplying detailed contact information.

This is the law in most countries and no regulated exchange can get around it, as any company interfacing with the current financial system must meet ‘know your customer’ (KYC) and anti-money laundering (AML) requirements.

The best exchange option also depends where you’re located.

For more information, you can check out this list of major bitcoin exchanges/wallets around the world, and the payment options they permit.

At this time, the largest total trading exchanges by volume are Bitfinex (Hong Kong), Bitstamp (US), BTC-e (unknown), Kraken (US), Huobi (China and Hong Kong), OKCoin (China) and BTCC (China).

Coinbase is a popular wallet and exchange service that will also trade US dollars and euros for bitcoins. The company has web and mobile apps. Originally a US-only service, Coinbase has recently opened up to a large number of European countries.

Circle offers users worldwide the chance to store, send, receive and exchange bitcoins. Presently only US citizens are able to link bank accounts to deposit funds, but credit and debit cards are also an option. Apps for iOS and Android are now available.

Wallet and bitcoin debit card provider Xapo has also recently entered the fray, suggesting deposits in fiat currency that are converted to bitcoin in your account.

Coinjar, an exchange and wallet provider, is the market leader in Australia. The Melbourne-based startup raised $500k AUD in venture funding and won an award at Finovate Europe two thousand fifteen for their user practice. The company released a debit card service, ‘Coinjar Swipe’ in February 2015.

The ‘Coinjar Swipe’ permits Australians to spend from Coinjar bitcoin accounts.

Unocoin is an exchange aimed at the Indian market, permitting users to buy, sell and store bitcoin. Deposits can be made via any national online bank or through NEFT/RTGS. Registration with a PAN card is necessary to use the site’s services.

Once you’ve set up your account, you’ll most likely need to link an existing bank account and arrange to budge funds inbetween it and your fresh exchange account via wire transfer. This usually entails a fee. Some exchanges permit you to make a deposit in person to their bank account (that is, via a human teller, not an ATM).

While people in most countries can transfer money to overseas accounts, fees are much higher and you may face more long delays switching your bitcoins back into fiat currency (should you still wish to do that).

If you are required to link a bank account to use the exchange, it may only admit banks from that country.

How can I buy bitcoins?

How Can I Buy Bitcoins?

Last updated: 28th October 2015

OK, so you’ve learned the basics about bitcoin, the next step is to get some bitcoins. But how? This guide will tell you what you need to know.

You can buy bitcoins from either exchanges, or directly from other people via marketplaces.

You can pay for them in a diversity of ways, ranging from hard cash to credit and debit cards to wire transfers, or even with other cryptocurrencies, depending on who you are buying them from and where you live.

Remarkably, it’s still not effortless to buy bitcoins with your credit card or PayPal, depending on your jurisdiction.

This is because such transactions can lightly be reversed with a phone call to the card company (ie ‘chargebacks’). Since it’s hard to prove any goods switched mitts in a transfer of bitcoins, exchanges avoid this payment method and so do most private sellers.

However, the options have recently grown for consumers in some countries.

In the US, Coinbase, and Circle suggest purchases with credit cards. Bittylicious, CoinCorner and Coinbase suggest this service in the UK, accepting 3D Secure-enabled credit and debit cards on the Visa and MasterCard networks.

Underbanked consumers in the US can turn to expresscoin, which recently launched to serve this market, accepting money orders, individual checks and wire transfers.

Very first, get yourself a bitcoin wallet

Next, you will need a place to store your fresh bitcoins. In the bitcoin world, they’re called a ‘wallet’ but it might be best to think of them as a kind of bank account.

Depending on the security levels you want, different wallets will provide different levels of security. Some act like everyday spending accounts and are comparable to a traditional leather wallet, while others tout military-grade protections.

The main options are: (1) a software wallet stored on the hard drive of your computer, (Two) an online, web-based service or (Three) a ‘vault’ service that keeps your bitcoins protected offline or multisig wallet that uses a number of keys to protect the account.

Most have their vulnerabilities: if you store bitcoins locally on your computer, make sure you back up your wallet regularly in case the drive becomes corrupted; and online web wallets employ varying degrees of security against hackers, from fairly good (multi-factor authentication) to fairly poor (ID and password).

For more on storing bitcoins, see our guide on the subject.

Exchanges and Online Wallets

Bitcoin newcomers will find a diversity of exchanges and wallets rivaling for their business.

Some are full-blown exchanges for institutional traders, while others are simpler wallet services with a more limited buying and selling capabilities.

Most exchanges and wallets will store amounts of digital and/or fiat currency for you, much like a regular bank account.

Exchanges and wallets are the best option if you want to engage in regular trading and speculation, don’t need total anonymity and don’t mind lengthy bureaucratic setup procedures that usually involve proof of identity and supplying detailed contact information.

This is the law in most countries and no regulated exchange can get around it, as any company interfacing with the current financial system must meet ‘know your customer’ (KYC) and anti-money laundering (AML) requirements.

The best exchange option also depends where you’re located.

For more information, you can check out this list of major bitcoin exchanges/wallets around the world, and the payment options they permit.

At this time, the largest utter trading exchanges by volume are Bitfinex (Hong Kong), Bitstamp (US), BTC-e (unknown), Kraken (US), Huobi (China and Hong Kong), OKCoin (China) and BTCC (China).

Coinbase is a popular wallet and exchange service that will also trade US dollars and euros for bitcoins. The company has web and mobile apps. Originally a US-only service, Coinbase has recently opened up to a large number of European countries.

Circle offers users worldwide the chance to store, send, receive and exchange bitcoins. Presently only US citizens are able to link bank accounts to deposit funds, but credit and debit cards are also an option. Apps for iOS and Android are now available.

Wallet and bitcoin debit card provider Xapo has also recently entered the fray, suggesting deposits in fiat currency that are converted to bitcoin in your account.

Coinjar, an exchange and wallet provider, is the market leader in Australia. The Melbourne-based startup raised $500k AUD in venture funding and won an award at Finovate Europe two thousand fifteen for their user practice. The company released a debit card service, ‘Coinjar Swipe’ in February 2015.

The ‘Coinjar Swipe’ permits Australians to spend from Coinjar bitcoin accounts.

Unocoin is an exchange aimed at the Indian market, permitting users to buy, sell and store bitcoin. Deposits can be made via any national online bank or through NEFT/RTGS. Registration with a PAN card is necessary to use the site’s services.

Once you’ve set up your account, you’ll very likely need to link an existing bank account and arrange to budge funds inbetween it and your fresh exchange account via wire transfer. This usually entails a fee. Some exchanges permit you to make a deposit in person to their bank account (that is, via a human teller, not an ATM).

While people in most countries can transfer money to overseas accounts, fees are much higher and you may face more long delays switching your bitcoins back into fiat currency (should you still wish to do that).

If you are required to link a bank account to use the exchange, it may only admit banks from that country.

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